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Taking care of the patient,
not just the cancer.

3555 10th Court | Vero Beach, FL 32960

If there could be anything more devastating than a cancer diagnosis, it would be learning the standard treatment protocols for your cancer are no longer effective for you.

Clinical trials are research studies that test new medical approaches. The Scully-Welsh Cancer Center believes access to clinical trials is an important weapon in the war against cancer and the hallmark of a top cancer care program.

Thanks to the affiliation with Duke Health, our patients have access to clinical trials from one of the country’s leading research centers, as designated by the National Cancer Institute (NCI).  Duke opens the door to thousands of clinical trials, many under the auspices of the National Institute of Health or NCI.  Offering access to clinical trials conducted by its own researchers, Duke also is a gateway to trials by other research institutions through a national cooperative and to Duke-approved trials by pharmaceutical companies.

Clinical trials are key to developing new methods to prevent, detect, and treat cancer. It is through clinical trials that researchers can determine whether new treatments are safe and effective and work better than current treatments. When a person takes part in a clinical study, it adds to the knowledge about cancer and helps improve cancer care.

Types of Clinical Trials

  • Treatment trials test new treatments (a new cancer drug, new approaches to surgery or radiation therapy, new combinations of treatments or new methods like gene therapy).
  • Prevention trials test new approaches, such as medicines, supplements or exercising that doctors believe may prevent cancer or lower the risk of a certain type of cancer.
  • Screening trials study the best way to test for and find cancer, especially in its early stages.
  • Quality-of-life trials, or supportive care trials, explore ways to improve comfort and quality of life for cancer patients.

Deciding to take part in a clinical trial is an individual, voluntary decision. A clinical trial is an option to obtain access to a possible higher technologically advanced treatment before it is approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The decision to participate must be made based on many factors, to include the benefits and risks of the study.

For more information, contact Monica Richardson by calling (772) 226-4916 or email us.